Isa Blumi, Ottoman Refugees, 1878-1939: Migration in a Post-Imperial World, Londres-New York, Bloomsbury Academic Press, 2013, 256 p.

Media of Ottoman Refugees, 1878-1939In the first half of the 20th century, throughout the Balkans and Middle East, a familiar story of destroyed communities forced to flee war or economic crisis unfolded. Often, these refugees of the Ottoman Empire – Christians, Muslims and Jews – found their way to new continents, forming an Ottoman diaspora that had a remarkable ability to reconstitute, and even expand, the ethnic, religious, and ideological diversity of their homelands.

Ottoman Refugees, 1878-1939 offers a unique study of a transitional period in world history experienced through these refugees living in the Middle East, the Americas, South-East Asia, East Africa and Europe. Isa Blumi explores the tensions emerging between those trying to preserve a world almost entirely destroyed by both the nation-state and global capitalism and the agents of the so-called Modern era.

Sommaire

Introduction
1 Prelude to Disaster: Finance Capitalism and the Political Economy of Imperial Collapse
2 Resettlement Regimes and Empire: The Politics of Caring for Ottoman Refugees
3 Traveling the Contours of an Ottoman Proximate World
4 Transitional Migrants: The Global Ottoman Refugee and Colonial Terror
5 Missionaries at the Imperial Ideological Edge
Conclusion
Notes
Bibliography
Index

Voir sur le site de l’éditeur


Vous aimerez aussi...