Conference « China in the Middle East » — Peking University, Pékin (Chine), 17-18/03/2015

International Conference:
China in the Middle East
Peking University and Indiana University
March 17-18, 2015

PRELIMINARY PROGRAM
Organized by
Dr. Kemal Silay, Ottoman and Modern Turkish Studies Chair, Indiana University, USA
Dr. Tuğrul Keskin, Portland State University, USA
Dr. Zan Tao, Peking University, People’s Republic of China

March 17, 2015

9:00 – 9:30 AM Opening Ceremony
Introduction by Dr. Kemal Silay, Indiana University
9:00 – 9:15 AM Welcome Speech by Dr. Wang Enge, President, Peking University
9:15 – 9:45 AM Keynote Speech by
9:45 – 12:00 Panels
1.     Panel 1:  Chinese Foreign Policy Towards the Middle East
MODERATOR: Zan Tao, Peking University
In this panel, we will explore Chinese Foreign Policy towards the Middle East after 1949.
1.     THE ROLE OF IDENTITY IN CHINA’S FOREIGN POLICY CHANGE – ANALYSIS OF CHINA’S MIDDLE EAST POLICY THROUGH A CONSTRUCTIVISM LENS – Xinhui Jiang, University of Delaware, USA
2.     CHINA’S MIDDLE EAST STRATEGY AFTER “ARAB SPRING – Kong Yan, The Middle East studies Institute of Shanghai International Studies University, P. R. CHINA
3.     MAKING A DIFFERENCE? CHINA AND THE ISRAELI-PALESTINIAN CONFLICT – Guy Burton University of Nottingham, Malaysia Campus, UK
4.     CHINA’S ROLE, OPERATION PROGRESS AND STRENGTH LIMITATION SINCE IRAQ RECONSTRUCTION: AN ANALYSIS BASED ON THE SWOT MODEL – Jiang Xudong The Middle East Studies Institute of Shanghai International Studies Shanghai, P. R. CHINA
5.     IS CHINA BECOMING A NEW HEGEMON IN THE MIDDLE EAST? – Mojtaba Mahdavi Associate Professor  University of Alberta, CANADA
6.     CHINESE FOREIGN POLICY TOWARDS IRAN’S NUCLEAR PROGRAM BEYOND THE REVISIONISM PARADIGM – Moritz A. Pieper, University of Kent, Brussels School of International Studies
2.     Panel 2: Sino-Turkish Relations: Past and Present
MODERATOR: Tugrul Keskin, Portland State University
Unlike other Middle Eastern societies, the relationship between Chinese and Turkish societies is a historic one, based on social, political and economic diversification. Social and political connection can be clearly seen in the history of Turkish people in Mahmud al-Kashgari and Yusuf Khass Hajib’s writings and ideas; however, following the emergence of nation-states in the 20th century and the economic globalization of China after Deng Xiaoping, these two societies and states have established a more economic based exchange which has become the core of their relationship. Over the last 20 years, Chinese economic growth led to much attention in Turkish economic circles. As a result, more Turkish and Chinese business communities began to engage in trade exchanges. Turkey, as a member of NATO, and wanting membership in EU, began to seek economic and political partners in the globalized world. In this panel, we will examine the Chinese-Turkish relationship in the modern era with these factors in mind.
1.     THE COVERAGE OF CHINA IN TURKISH ACADEMIC LITERATURE: AN OVERVIEW – Seriye SEZEN, Professor of Public Administration Public Administration Institute for Turkey and the Middle East, TURKEY
2.     TURKISH – CHINESE BILATERAL AND MULTILATERAL SECURITY COOPERATION – Lenore G. Martin, Harvard University
3.     THE DEVELOPING RELATIONS BETWEEN TURKEY AND CHINA IN LAST DECADE – BARIŞ DOSTER, Assoc. Prof. Marmara University, TURKEY
4.     SINO-TURKISH RELATIONS IN THE CONTEXT OF COLD WAR POLITICS – Barış ADIBELLİ, Assistant Professor Deptartment of  Political Science and International Relations Dumlupinar University, TURKEY
5.     CONFICIUS INSTITUTES’ IMPORTANCE IN TURKISH-CHINESE RELATIONS – Begümşen Ergenekon, Middle East Technical University, TURKEY
6.     TURKEY AND CHINA IN CENTRAL ASIA: THE NEW SILK ROAD TO THE NASCENT STRUGGLE FOR RECOGNITION IN INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS – Emilian Kavalski Associate Professor of Global Studies Institute for Social Justice Australian Catholic University, AUSTRALIA
12:00-13:30 PM Lunch
14:00-16:30 PM Panels
3.     Panel 3: Sino-Iranian Relations: Past and Present
MODERATOR: Jamsheed Choksy, Indiana University
One of the examples of a stable relationship between China and a Middle Eastern state can be the mutually beneficial friendship between China and Iran. Iran has had a long historical and diplomatic relationship with the PRC in the 20th century; however, today, Sino-Persian ties are mostly in trade and commerce. With the growth of the Chinese economy and the search for more energy resources, the PRC began to shift its foreign policy towards the Middle East, specifically Iran. This panel explores current social, political, and economic trends in the Sino-Persian relationship.
1.     CHINA’S STRATEGIC RELATIONS WITH IRAN – Ya Zhao, Indiana University-Bloomington, USA
2.     CHINA-IRAN COOPERATION IN CENTRAL ASIA – Ajay Patnaik, Jawaharlal Nehru University, INDIA
3.     CHINA’S STRATEGIC CULTURE AND ITS NON-PROLIFERATION BEHAVIOR TOWARDS IRAN – Mohiaddin Messbahi, Associate Professor and Director of Middle East Studies, Florida International University and Mohamad Homayounvash, Visiting Assistant Professor Department of Political Science Louisiana State University, USA
4.     UNDERSTANDING CHINA-IRAN ENERGY RELATIONS: ITS INTENTIONS, COMPLEXITIES AND RAMIFICATIONS – Sima Baidya Assistant Professor at the Centre for West Asian Studies, School of International Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University, INDIA
5.     IRAN AND CHINA: A SOFT POWER COALITION – Arash Reisinezhad, Research Fellow at the Middle East Studies Center and Politics and International Relations School of International and Public Affairs Florida International University, USA
4.     Panel 4: Sino-Israeli Relations: Past and Present
MODERATOR: Kemal Silay, Indiana University
Although Israel was one of the first nations to recognize the PRC as a legitimate government, China did not establish its diplomatic relationship with Israel until 1992. However, since then, both countries have developed commercial and military links based on mutual benefits. An interesting aspect of the Sino-Israeli relationship is that the Chinese accepted Holocaust survivors escaping from Nazi persecutions. The panel investigates Sino-Jewish relationships in the contemporary era.
1.     THE SINO-ISRAEL RELATIONSHIP FROM THE CHINESE PERSPECTIVE – Dr. Yiyi Chen, Professor, Director, Center for Middle East Peace Studies, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China.
2.     ISRAEL-CHINA RELATIONS: THE POST HARPY-DRONE DECADE – Alvite Singh Ningthoujam, Jawaharlal Nehru University, INDIA
3.     LOOKING EAST? ISRAEL’S GEO-POLITICS IN THE EARLY ‘CHINESE CENTURY’ – Niv HORESH, Professor Chair in the Modern History of China Director of the China Policy Institute (CPI) School of Contemporary Chinese Studies University of Nottingham, UK
4.     CHINA AND THE MIDDLE EAST: EMBARKING ON A STRATEGIC APPROACH – James M. Dorsey Senior Fellow, S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies, Nanyang Technological University, SINGAPORE

March 18, 2015
Indiana University China Office

9:30-12:00
5.     Panel 5: Sino-Arab Relations: Past and Present
MODERATOR:  Mojtaba Mahdavi, University of Alberta
Chinese and Arab-populated states are the product of the colonial conditions in the 20th century. However, both Chinese and Arab societies have an economic and social exchange which predates Islam. This exchange has created mutual understanding and led to mutual benefits. Chinese interests in Arab-populated societies are purely based on economic investment and energy resources. On the other hand, Arabs view China as a new global partner, not replacing the US and Europe, but rather as a new relationship in the globalized era. This panel focuses on social, political, and economic exchange between the PRC and Arab states in the modern era.
1.     THE GULF LOOKS EAST: SINO-ARAB RELATIONS IN AN AGE OF INSTABILITY – Geoffrey F. Gresh, Associate Professor National Defense University, USA
2.     CHINA – GULF RELATIONS: CURRENT STRENGTHS AND FUTURE POSSIBILITIES – Jacqueline Armijo, Associate Professor, Department of International Affairs Qatar University, QATAR
3.     CHINA IN WESTERN ASIA: HARMONIOUS TRANSITIONS – Dr. Corinna Mullin and Dr. Yonit Manor-Percival, London School of Economics and Political Science, UK
4.     CHINA’S EMERGING SOFT POWER IN THE MIDDLE EAST: CULTURAL DIPLOMACY OF CHINA’S ARABIC SATELLITE TELEVISION CHANNEL – Wai-Yip Ho Department of Social Sciences, Hong Kong Institute of Education
6.     Panel 6: China’s Energy Security Strategy and the Middle East 
MODERATOR: Carol E.B. Choksy, Indiana University
The Middle East is considered an American backyard for energy resources; however, with the increased need of oil for newly emerging economies, the Middle East has received a lot of attention from states such as China. After 2020, US domestic oil production will eliminate the need for foreign oil sources; therefore, the US will play less of a role in the Middle Eastern oil market. However, current trends in the Chinese economy point to their increased need for foreign energy in the future. This panel will examine the overlapping interests of China and the United States in the Middle East.
1.     SEEK KNOWLEDGE EVEN IF TAKES YOU TO CHINA (VIA WASHINGTON): AMERICA, CHINA, AND SAUDI ARABIA IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY – Sean Foley, Associate Professor Department of History Middle Tennessee State University, USA
2.     A FIVE-DIMENSIONAL PARADIGM: ENERGY, TRADE, ARMS SALES, CULTURAL RELATIONS, AND POLITICAL COOPERATION – Muhamad Olimat, Associate Professor, Inst.of Int.& Civil Sec. Khalifa University of Science, Technology & Research Abu Dhabi, UAE
3.     HAJJ POLITICS AND HAJJ DIPLOMACY IN MODERN CHINA – Alexander Jost, Managing Director, European Centre for Chinese Studies at Peking University (ECCS)
4.     TURKEY’S RELATIONSHIP WITH CHINA AND THE UYGHUR ISSUE – Mahesh Ranjan Debata Assistant Professor Centre for Inner Asian Studies  School of International Studies Jawaharlal Nehru University, INDIA
5.     BEING GLOBAL POWER THROUGH SOFT POWER: CHINA CASE IN THE CAUCASIAN AND CENTRAL ASIA REGION – Ozlem Aruz Azer, Istanbul University, TURKEY
6. POLITICAL ECONOMY OF CHINA TOWARD MIDDLE EAST – Juan Cole, University of Michigan, USA
Closing Remarks by President Michael McRobbie, Indiana University, Bloomington

Vous aimerez aussi...