Lapidus, Ira M., A History of Islamic Societies, 3e édition, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2014.

This third edition of Ira M. Lapidus’s classic A History of Islamic Societies has been substantially revised to incorporate the insights of new scholarship and updated to include historical developments in the first decade of the twenty-first century. Lapidus’s history explores the beginnings and transformations of Islamic civilizations in the Middle East and details Islam’s worldwide diffusion to Africa; Spain; Turkey and the Balkans; Central, South, and Southeast Asia; and North America, situating Islamic societies within their global, political, and economic contexts. The narrative is unified by its focus on the organization of primary communities, religious groups and states, and the institutions and cultures that define them. Organized in narrative sections corresponding to the history of each major region, with innovative, analytic summary introductions and conclusions, this book is a unique endeavor. The informative and substantial update, balanced judgement, and clarity of presentation ensure that it will remain a classic in the field.

  • Table of Contents

    Introduction to Islamic societies
    Part I. The Beginnings of Islamic Civilizations:
    1. Middle Eastern societies before Islam
    2. Historians and the sources
    3. Arabia
    4. Muhammad: preaching, community, and state formation
    5. Introduction to the Arab-Muslim empires
    6. The Arab-Muslim conquests and the socioeconomic bases of empire
    7. Regional developments: economic and social change
    8. The Caliphate to 750
    9. The ‘Abbasid Empire
    10. Decline and fall of the ‘Abbasid Empire
    11. Introduction: religion and identity
    12. The ideology of imperial Islam
    13. The ‘Abbasids: Caliphs and emperors
    14. Introduction
    15. Sunni Islam
    16. Shi’i Islam
    17. Muslim urban societies to the tenth century
    18. The non-Muslim minorities
    19. Continuity and change in the historic cultures of the Middle East
    Part II. From Islamic Community to Islamic Society:
    20. The Post- ‘Abbasid Middle Eastern state system
    21. Muslim communities and Middle Eastern societies:
    1000–1500 CE
    22. The collective ideal
    23. The personal ethic
    24. Conclusion: Middle Eastern Islamic patterns
    Part III. The Global Expansion of Islam from the Seventh to the Nineteenth Century:
    25. Introduction: Islamic institutions
    26. Islamic North Africa to the thirteenth century
    27. Spanish-Islamic civilization
    28. Tunisia, Algeria, and Morocco from the thirteenth to the nineteenth centuries
    29. States and Islam: North African variations
    30. Introduction: empires and societies
    31. The Turkish migrations and the Ottoman Empire
    32. The postclassical Ottoman Empire: decentralization, commercialization, and incorporation
    33. The Arab provinces under Ottoman rule
    34. The Safavid Empire
    35. The Indian subcontinent: the Delhi Sultanates and the Mughal Empire
    36. Islamic empires compared
    37. Inner Asia from the Mongol conquests to the nineteenth century
    38. Islamic societies in Southeast Asia
    39. The African context: Islam, slavery, and colonialism
    40. Islam in Sudanic, Savannah, and forest West Africa
    41. The West African Jihads
    42. Islam in East Africa and the European colonial empires
    43. The varieties of Islamic societies
    44. The global context
    Part IV. The Modern Transformation:
    45. Introduction: imperialism, modernity, and the transformation of Muslim societies
    46. The dissolution of the Ottoman empire and the modernization of Turkey
    47. Iran: state and religion in the modern era
    48. Egypt: secularism and Islamic modernity
    49. The Arab east: Arabism, military states, and Islam
    50. The Arabian peninsula
    51. North Africa in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries
    52. Women in the Middle East: nineteenth to twenty-first centuries
    53. Muslims in Russia, the Caucasus, Inner Asia, and China
    54. The Indian subcontinent: India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Bangladesh
    55. Islam in Southeast Asia: Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines
    56. Islam in West Africa
    57. Islam in East Africa
    58. Universal Islam and African diversity
    59. Muslims in Europe and America
    Conclusion: secularized Islam and Islamic revival.

    Voir sur le site de l’éditeur


Vous aimerez aussi...